Turkey Vegetable Soup

Pin It

Last weekend was Canadian Thanksgiving, and as is the norm after cooking a 10lb bird for 3 people (actually I cooked for 4, but my daughter is a vegetarian), there are oodles of leftovers…..leftover.  This soup is hearty and has a good zip to it with the addition of the canned tomatoes with chiles (ie. Rotel).

First order after removing the remaining meat from the bird was to put the carcass in a large stock pot and add about 12 cups water.  Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover and let simmer for several hours. Remove from heat and let sit overnight.

Next day, remove carcass and strain the broth into a large bowl. Cover and put in the fridge so that any remaining fat solidifies to be skimmed off the next morning.

Now you have great base for your soup!

Studio_20171016_061728

Ingredients

10 to 12 cups turkey broth
1/2 yellow onion, diced
1 cup diced celery
1 cup carrots, sliced
1 large golden beet, peeled and cut into 1cm cubes (about 1 1/2 cups)
1 cup mini red potatoes cut into 1cm pieces
500 ml jar of canned tomatoes with chiles *
1 1/2 cups shredded turkey meat (white/dark or both)
1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
2 sprigs of oregano, leaves stripped and chopped
Salt and pepper to taste
Olive oil

Directions

In a large stock pot over medium heat, drizzle 2 tbsp olive oil.  Add onions and celery and cook for 3 to 5 minutes until onions are translucent.   Add carrots, beets and potatoes and cook for another 5 minutes stirring often.  Puree the canned tomatoes with chiles and add to the pot.  Add herbs and turkey broth.  Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 2 to 3 hours.  If you like a thicker consistency to your soups, dissolve 2 heaping tablespoons of cornstarch in one cup of cold water and add to soup 20 minutes before serving.

Serve with a side salad and a crusty harvest grain bread.

Makes 8 servings

Deborah

* Substitute plain canned tomatoes for the tomatoes with chile’s if you don’t like spice.

 

 

Save

Save

Follow Me on Pinterest

Dyeing with Onion Skins

Pin It

I have done this dye job once before, but didn’t document it very well so figured I would have a virtual record of it this go round.

Dyeing fibres with onion skins is amazingly simple.  You don’t need any mordants (Che icals that affix the dye particles to the fibres) and you can use your regular kitchen utensils (but, if you are going to use other plant based dyes or chemical dyes, you must have a separate set of utensils so as not to contaminate and possibly make yourself very ill!) and it’s one of the few plant based dyes that don’t stink up the kitchen.

Next up, save onion skins, the dry outer layers only.  If you eat a lot of onions, it doesn’t take long, but if you don’t,  ask family to save them for your or ask your grocer if he will give you the remnants in the onion bins.  It took me about 9 months to save these two amounts here.
Studio_20171005_152418I separated them by colour, having more of the red, but still a huge amount of both.  In a large pot (2 pots, one for each colour), bring skins to a boil, then simmer for a couple hours.  Turn heat off and let cool overnight.  Next day, strain skins out and you are ready to dye!

20171006_135719

Add presoaked (in water) yarns or cotton/linen/silk fabrics and slowly bring the temp up to 170F.  Make sure the pots have lots of water/dye so that the fibres have room to move freely around.  Don’t stir, swirl or vigorously poke animal fibres or you will felt them.  Just let them sit and do their thing.  Once up to temp, hold that temp for about an hour.  Turn heat off and let cool overnight.

Remove skeins from the dye bath, rinse and wash and hang to dry.  If there is still lots of Colour left in the dye bath,  add another skein of yarn and repeat the process.  The colour will be paler than the first, but still give a good shade, this is called an exhaust bath.

Studio_20171011_052715

Above skeins are (left to right): red skins-1st bath, red skins-exhaust bath, yellow skins-exhaust bath, yellow skins-1st bath

You can modify the colours using different modifiers,  ie vinegar, ammonia, or just using an iron pot.  I ended up with the green skein using the red onion skins but using filtered lake water.  Our lake has a lot of iron in it and therefore it reacted with the red onion skin and produced a nice shade of green.  Strangely, it didn’t affect the yellow onion skins.

I have a few more skeins to dye using black Walnut husks, which will compliment these skeins nicely in a planned woven rug, so stay tuned!

Deborah

Follow Me on Pinterest

September KAL (Knit Along)

Pin It

For those knitters and fibre enthusiasts out there, you know the feeling of completing a KAL with a great bunch of like minded folk. For those that aren’t into fibre-arts, you are missing out!

20171001_125353

For the month of September,  I signed up to knit a shawl for a KAL group on Ravelry, which by the way, if you are not a part of and you are a fibre geek, then I suggest you head over pronto to sign up (its free) and you will then have access to oodles of patterns from mitts to socks to hats to sweaters and blankets in every style,  for every age, and most are free patterns!

Anyway, back to the KAL.

The group I am a part of is called the DIY & DYE, where we spin, dye and knit our creations from raw fleece.  I joined in with some alpaca that I had spun and hand-painted and included a commercial skein of yarn in a contrasting neon peach colour.

The pattern was somewhat simple, but it still took some concentration after making a….design element, yes we call mistakes “design elements”.  Aside from the impromptu changes to the pattern, I finished the project just one day outside of September, even with life getting in the way.

The pattern, called “Metalouse” by Stephen West (a well known knit designer in the knitting world) features a striking pattern created by slipped stitches in a contrasting colour that melds beautifully with the variegated handspun alpaca.

I simply love how this turned out and have another one planned very soon.  Have you been a part of a KAL or CAL (crochet along) or even a WAL (weave along)? If so, I would love to see your creations, feel free to tell me all about them or link your projects below!

20171001_125318

Follow Me on Pinterest

Tomato & Avocado Salad

Pin It

I had a pretty good garden crop this year, especially the tomatoes.  A bumper crop of the luscious round globes had me eating them in a variety of ways, especially with the extended summer heat of September.  The thought of having to prepare and cook a hot meal on days where the mercury climbed above 30C had me melting into a puddle.  Salads became a staple for lunches and dinners.

A favourite is this super simple and super tasty tomato and avocado salad.  With so few ingredients, you are done in a snap!

20170912_122433

Ingredients
4 Garden Fresh Tomatoes (for a prettier plate, use multi-coloured tomatoes like Golden Queen and Heirloom varieties)
2 ripe Haas Avocados
1/4 cup diced Red or Sweet Onion
6 fresh sprigs of Cilantro
1/4 cup Olive Oil
Juice of 2 Limes
Salt and Pepper to taste

Directions

In a small bowl, whisk olive oil with the fresh lime juice and set aside.

Slice tomatoes and arrange on 2 plates.  Peel, pit and slice avocados and arrange over the tomatoes.  Sprinkle onion over tomatoes and avocados.  Drizzle with the olive oil and lime dressing and top with fresh cilantro leaves. That’s it! You are done!  To make this into a satisfying and healthy dinner salad, just add some grilled chicken or salmon along with a nice crusty loaf of whole grain bread.

Serve immediately.  Makes 2 servings.

Follow Me on Pinterest

Welcome back!

Pin It

Not just to me, but to my loyal readers and I hope some new ones as well.  After fighting with an apparent “push” by Facebook that has derailed my newsfeed (and with no fix, reason, explanation, or CARE from FB), I will no longer be using that site.

welcome backInstead, I have invited new and old friends to receiving updates either via subscribing to the email list (select “Subscribe” from the main page, or by selecting the RSS feed option at the bottom-right hand side of the main page labeled “Entries RSS”.

I have a load of new ideas for the coming days/weeks with new recipes, knitting/weaving exploits and even though gardening season is fast coming to a close, I have loads of garden tips and tricks to share.

So stay tuned! :)

 

Save

Follow Me on Pinterest

Lightened Up Egg Salad

Pin It

I love eggs.  One of Nature’s wonders of the food world.  I would love to eat them everyday, but my family history is peppered with heart health issues so I only indulge when I really, really, really have a craving for them.

Yesterday was one of those days.  I came back from a bike ride and while cooling down from the physical exertion, I started having a hankering for egg salad for lunch.  Not keeping any mayo in the house (high in fat and calories) I Googled whether or not I could sub fat free Greek yogurt for the mayo in egg salad.  Why yes you can!  Duh. I have already been replacing mayo in a lot of other dishes (chipotle mayo for my fish tacos for example) so I don’t know why it didn’t occur to me sooner to replace mayo with yogurt in egg salad.

Probably because I hadn’t had a craving for it in a very long time, until now!

So I took my favourite egg salad recipe and just swapped out the mayo with the yogurt.  You know what?  You would never know it wasn’t mayo!  I am going to have to splurge a little more often on egg salad, it was just too darn good!

For anyone wanting my egg salad recipe, here it is below, but most recipes that you find online are pretty close unless you get into some weird flavour combos.  Me, I like plain old egg salad. Nothing fancy for me.  I am a purist when it comes to this long standing traditional dish.

Studio_20170803_143742

Deborah’s Egg Salad Recipe

Ingredients
4 hard boiled eggs, peeled and chopped
1/4 cup diced celery
1/4 cup diced green onion (green parts only)
1/4 cup (or more to taste) of Fat-Free Yogurt
1 Tbsp mustard
1/4 tsp chile powder (I like to use either chipotle chile powder or pequin chile powder)
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions
In a medium bowl, mix together mustard and yogurt, add remaining ingredients and mix well. Let sit in fridge for at least 60 minutes to chill.

Serve on buns, wraps or whatever vessel you prefer. If you are doing the no carbs thing, lettuce bowls make an attractive presentation.

Enjoy!

Deborah

Follow Me on Pinterest

CopyCat Deep Dish Shroom Pizza

Pin It

This is 2 years in the making.  Well, technically dreaming of making it over the last 2 years, but the other day I finally had an epiphany about the mushrooms in this pizza.

Hubs is back working in NY state temporarily on a special project and pretty much the first thing I asked was if Uno’s Shroom Pizza is still on the menu.  Sadly no, they pulled it off again.  I can see why because of the amount of cheese used as well as the time it takes to make this pizza, or more importantly, the time necessary for marinating of the mushrooms can cause their costs to produce to be quite high.

I knew the little round scrumptious fungi were marinated in something, but I couldn’t figure out what.  Until the other day.  I was minding my own business, trimming my herb garden when it hit me.  Thyme, there has to be thyme in it along with the white wine.

After gardening chores, I pulled my tablet out and googled “marinated mushrooms”….BINGO.

A dozen or so recipes came up, pretty much all the same with slight variations.  So I picked one and got to work.  The mushrooms need to marinate overnight, hence why I think this (and the amount of cheese) is why Uno’s Grill only brings it back for a short time.  Definitely a loss leader for them, I am sure they try to sell more beer/liquor to make up for it.

Anyway, back to the shrooms!  Marinating the mushrooms is THE key to this pizza and this must be done 1 day earlier.  As for the deep dish pizza crust, I like Uno’s 5-grain version but couldn’t find a copycat out there (another thing to work on) so I just used my own pizza dough recipe here: http://www.ournorthernhomestead.com/how-to-make-your-own-pizza-doughand-make-it-healthier-too/

_DSC6274

CopyCat Deep Dish Shroom Pizza!

Ingredients

Pizza Dough (recipe link above, or google Deep Dish Pizza Dough recipe)
1 cup baby spinach leaves, washed and stems removed
2 cups shredded Mozzarella cheese
2 Tbsp grated Parmesan or Asiago cheese
1 lb Button mushrooms (if buttons are not available, quarter larger mushrooms)

For Marinade:
2 Tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil
2 Tbsp White Wine Vinegar (or White Balsamic Vinegar)
1 lemon, zested and juiced
1 clove garlic, minced
1 small shallot, minced
1 Tbsp fresh Thyme (or 1/2 Tbsp dried)
1/2 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp fresh cracked black pepper

Rinse mushrooms and slice a layer off the stem end (if mushrooms are larger, quarter them); bring a pot of water to a boil, add mushrooms and reduce heat to med-low and simmer for 2 minutes. Drain mushrooms and rinse with cold water, set on a towel to dry.
Meanwhile, whisk remaining ingredients together in a container large enough to hold all the mushrooms and marinade. Add mushrooms and combine. Seal up container and place in fridge overnight.

Directions

Prepare Pizza Dough (see recipe link above), this will make 2 small pizzas or one large one. If making 2 small, use a 9″ cake pan or a deep dish metal pie plate. For a large pizza, use a large, cast iron skillet.
**Note – if making 2 small pizzas, divide toppings in half between the 2 pans

Grease skillet/pans with Olive Oil

Preheat oven to 500F

_DSC6256

Roll out dough and lay over the pan, gently press dough down and up along sides to the top edge. Trim an excess dough. **Let dough sit for 20 minutes before filling**

_DSC6257

Drain mushrooms from marinade (reserve marinade – see footnote) and place in bottom of the pan on top of dough.

_DSC6259

Layer spinach (I actually used chopped chard from the garden as I didn’t have spinach, which is an excellent substitute) over the mushrooms.

_DSC6263

Add mozzarella cheese and top with parmesan or asiago.

Bake for 20 to 25 minutes (for 9″ size), up to 35 minutes for a large pizza **keep an eye on the top crust so that it doesn’t burn)

Remove from oven, let cool a few minutes and serve!

_DSC6268

Voila! A thing of beauty!

Deborah

*Marinade Footnote – Marinade can be used for roasting beets, trim beets, place in a baking dish and pour marinade overtop.  Cover and roast for 35-45 minutes in a 400F oven or until beets are cooked through.  Let cool, peel and chop.  These are FANTASTIC on salads!

**Edit ~ I used the leftover marinade as a salad dressing….yowza! What fantastic mushroom flavour it added to a tossed salad!

 

Save

Save

Follow Me on Pinterest

Fuerig The Baby Alpaca

Pin It

I really wish I could have met Fuerig in person.  With his glossy black locks and cool demeanor, I could envision him strutting around the paddock like a camelid version of Fabio, beckoning to the ladies housed in the next pasture over with a “hello gorgeous, come here often?” line.

Since the owner sold him for breeding stock before I arrived at the ranch, the next best thing was to acquire 2 of his fleeces.  The first fleece being his ”cria” fleece (cria is what a baby alpaca is called) with a 4 1/2″ long staple length and slight crimp, the lustrous jet black locks are incredibly soft and as fine as angora bunny fur.  Unfortunately it is full of VM (vegetable matter) and the processing mill had sent it back as they didn’t want to deal with all that VM.  I figure I have plenty of time to painstakingly pick out bits of hay knowing full well that the end product will be well worth the effort.

DSC05876The second fleece was from his next (2nd) shearing, it still needs a light skirting as well as a bath but it is currently housed in an airtight tote bin while I finish processing his baby fleece. I have big plans for both fleeces, but first I was itching to spin some of the baby fleece as its reputation of being an exceptionally soft fiber is prized by knitters the world over.

For those that have yet to spin alpaca (or other camelid) fibers, the weight and feel of alpaca yarns are nothing like that of yarn made with sheep’s wool.  Wool fiber ranges from rough to ultra soft, depending on the breed, they have somewhat denser locks but with a distinct bouncy feel.  Alpacas don’t bounce, they just lay flat out on the ground and snooze and their fiber feels exactly the same, heavy and with great draping qualities.

10351730_10152717633959054_2321268615927224487_nAfter a week of picking, washing and drying, the silky black locks were ready for further processing.  I automatically chose to use my hand cards for this one over the drum carder for two reasons.  First being the drum carder was up north at the cottage and I and the fleece were not and two, the fineness and length of the staples called for a delicate hand while carding so as not to damage or break the fibers.  Combing could have been another option for processing, if I had a pair of hand combs that is, but I don’t, so hand cards are the weapon of choice.

I spent a wet and dreary Saturday afternoon picking and carding 2 ounces of fiber to spin for a test skein.  Once prepped into rolags, I divided the batch in half and eagerly sat down with my antique Nova Scotian wheel and got to work.  Wow, this fiber spun with ease.  So soft and silky and at times a little slippery, but it was a real pleasure to spin, with the exception of stopping to pick VM out occasionally.

I wanted the finished yarn to feel as close to commercially spun baby alpaca yarn as possible.  Once your fingers touch one of those soft, squooshy and smooshy hanks of yarn, it’s impossible to put it back down and next thing you know it’s in your shopping bag and your wallet is noticeably lighter.  So the trick to getting that baby soft feel is to keep as little twist to the yarn as possible.  Only add enough twist to hold the single together if you are keeping it as a single.  If you are plying with 2 or more singles, then add a tich more twist, being careful not to add too much though or you will end up with a skein of kitchen twine.  Desirable only if you have a turkey to truss.

After I spun a few meters, I pulled a length of the single back off the bobbin and plied it against itself for a sample.  Perfect.  It was turning out exactly as I envisioned.  It was about a light fingering weight for the 2-ply, but that will most likely change with wet finishing, so for now I cut that off and added it to my control card and then spent the next day spinning up a couple bobbins, each holding an ounce of fiber.  I let the bobbins rest for a day, and then plied them together into a gorgeous hank of jet black, shiny yarn.

DSC06000

I ended up with 177 yards out of the 2 ounces of fiber and after a wash and set at the salon, the yarn bloomed to 12 wpi, about a DK weight yarn.  I was aiming for Fingering weight, but overall was happy with it as the intended project is a shawl and gauge isn’t terribly important in shawls.

With the test skein of Fuerig’s cria fleece complete, I need to finalize what shawl pattern to use.  Normally I spin for an already chosen project, like my Fert & Palladin Alpaca Throw Blanket (http://www.ournorthernhomestead.com/meet-fert-and-palladin), but acquiring this fleece at the last minute left me with no time to search for the right pattern beforehand.  I was also somewhat affected by the ‘oooo shiny’ syndrome of wanting to play with the fleece immediately after obtaining it.  I am sure a lot of fiber enthusiasts out there can relate or attest to the reality of the ‘oooo shiny’ syndrome, it often afflicts even the most disciplined fiber-holic.

Now it’s time to cruise the internet halls of Ravelry, window shopping for shawls from the comfort of my arm chair with a cup of tea in hand, then back to finish spinning up the rest of Fuerig’s fleece…… unless the ‘oooo shiny’ syndrome strikes again.

Deborah

Save

Follow Me on Pinterest

Squash & Black Bean Quesadilla

Pin It

Tonight’s dinner was a snap, especially when you already have 2 of the star ingredients cooked and on hand.  In this case, it was the squash and beans.  I am a bean snob, I prefer to rehydrate and cook my own vs canned beans, something about starting out from scratch that has always appealed to me, in whatever I do.

Anyway, back to quesadillas!  and yes, another (say it with emphasis now)… a-nother!Mexican flavor inspired recipe.  I had already made the beans for another batch of my black bean and wild/brown rice enchiladas and the squash was leftover from dinner on Sunday, so I was looking through my recipes for quesadillas and landed on my empanada recipe and thought…why not switch out the sweet potato for the squash and slap the contents into a tortilla?!

Bravo! We have a winner!  A couple other changes and the whole thing was on the plate in less than 15 minutes.

20170613_203845

Ingredients
1 Cup cooked black beans
1 Cup roasted butternut squash (if cubed, mash slightly)
1 small clove garlic, peeled and mashed
1 Tbsp finely chopped jalapeno
3 Tbsp chopped red onion
1/4 tsp ground coriander
1/4 tsp ground cumin
Salt and Pepper to taste
1 Large 10″ Whole Wheat floour toritilla
Olive Oil
1/4 cup Monterey Jack Cheese, shredded
Juice from one lime
Avocado
Sour Cream
Cilantro

Directions

In  skillet set over medium heat, lightly toast cumin, coriander, salt and pepper until fragrant (about a minute), add oil, onion and jalapeno.  Saute for 2 minutes until onion softens, add garlic and lime juice. Stir constantly for about a minute or two until garlic softens.  Reduce heat to low and add beans and squash.  Combine thoroughly and let contents warm through (about 2-3 minutes).  Remove from pan and set aside.

In same skillet, turning heat up to medium-low, place tortilla in the pan and add cheese to one half.  Add squash/bean mixture over the cheese.  Fold tortilla in half and cook until the bottom starts to brown (about 2-3 minutes).  Flip and cook the other side for 2-3 minutes.

Remove from skillet and serve immediately with cilantro, sour cream and avocado.

This recipe makes one serving, size up as necessary!

Salud!

Deborah

Follow Me on Pinterest

Duvet Cover Wrestling

Pin It

I am sure I am not the only one that hates wrestling a duvet into its over-sized pillow case periodically.  Been doing it for years and always procrastinate about washing the cover just to avoid the impending wrestling match.

As I was mentally getting psyched up for the task I had a brain wave, a storm surge, an epiphany….whatever you call it, this GREAT idea popped into my head.

CLOTHESPINS!

clothespin_01

Why don’t I insert the duvet up to the top corners of the cover and using clothespins, pin them together to hold, then travel along the length of the top pinning as I go.

DSC06113

DSC06114

THEN, you can grasp the top and wildly flap the whole dang thing around the room to shake the cover down over the duvet without it sliding back out. In the time it takes to say “Bob’s Your Uncle!”, the duvet is smoothly nestled into its cover with nary a sweat broken or curse word spoken.

Brilliant I am.

Hopefully nobody has thought of this idea before, ’cause if I find out it was already out there and nobody told me, I am going to be pretty upset.

Deborah

 

Follow Me on Pinterest