Turkey Vegetable Soup

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Last weekend was Canadian Thanksgiving, and as is the norm after cooking a 10lb bird for 3 people (actually I cooked for 4, but my daughter is a vegetarian), there are oodles of leftovers…..leftover.  This soup is hearty and has a good zip to it with the addition of the canned tomatoes with chiles (ie. Rotel).

First order after removing the remaining meat from the bird was to put the carcass in a large stock pot and add about 12 cups water.  Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover and let simmer for several hours. Remove from heat and let sit overnight.

Next day, remove carcass and strain the broth into a large bowl. Cover and put in the fridge so that any remaining fat solidifies to be skimmed off the next morning.

Now you have great base for your soup!

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Ingredients

10 to 12 cups turkey broth
1/2 yellow onion, diced
1 cup diced celery
1 cup carrots, sliced
1 large golden beet, peeled and cut into 1cm cubes (about 1 1/2 cups)
1 cup mini red potatoes cut into 1cm pieces
500 ml jar of canned tomatoes with chiles *
1 1/2 cups shredded turkey meat (white/dark or both)
1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
2 sprigs of oregano, leaves stripped and chopped
Salt and pepper to taste
Olive oil

Directions

In a large stock pot over medium heat, drizzle 2 tbsp olive oil.  Add onions and celery and cook for 3 to 5 minutes until onions are translucent.   Add carrots, beets and potatoes and cook for another 5 minutes stirring often.  Puree the canned tomatoes with chiles and add to the pot.  Add herbs and turkey broth.  Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 2 to 3 hours.  If you like a thicker consistency to your soups, dissolve 2 heaping tablespoons of cornstarch in one cup of cold water and add to soup 20 minutes before serving.

Serve with a side salad and a crusty harvest grain bread.

Makes 8 servings

Deborah

* Substitute plain canned tomatoes for the tomatoes with chile’s if you don’t like spice.

 

 

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Dyeing with Onion Skins

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I have done this dye job once before, but didn’t document it very well so figured I would have a virtual record of it this go round.

Dyeing fibres with onion skins is amazingly simple.  You don’t need any mordants (Che icals that affix the dye particles to the fibres) and you can use your regular kitchen utensils (but, if you are going to use other plant based dyes or chemical dyes, you must have a separate set of utensils so as not to contaminate and possibly make yourself very ill!) and it’s one of the few plant based dyes that don’t stink up the kitchen.

Next up, save onion skins, the dry outer layers only.  If you eat a lot of onions, it doesn’t take long, but if you don’t,  ask family to save them for your or ask your grocer if he will give you the remnants in the onion bins.  It took me about 9 months to save these two amounts here.
Studio_20171005_152418I separated them by colour, having more of the red, but still a huge amount of both.  In a large pot (2 pots, one for each colour), bring skins to a boil, then simmer for a couple hours.  Turn heat off and let cool overnight.  Next day, strain skins out and you are ready to dye!

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Add presoaked (in water) yarns or cotton/linen/silk fabrics and slowly bring the temp up to 170F.  Make sure the pots have lots of water/dye so that the fibres have room to move freely around.  Don’t stir, swirl or vigorously poke animal fibres or you will felt them.  Just let them sit and do their thing.  Once up to temp, hold that temp for about an hour.  Turn heat off and let cool overnight.

Remove skeins from the dye bath, rinse and wash and hang to dry.  If there is still lots of Colour left in the dye bath,  add another skein of yarn and repeat the process.  The colour will be paler than the first, but still give a good shade, this is called an exhaust bath.

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Above skeins are (left to right): red skins-1st bath, red skins-exhaust bath, yellow skins-exhaust bath, yellow skins-1st bath

You can modify the colours using different modifiers,  ie vinegar, ammonia, or just using an iron pot.  I ended up with the green skein using the red onion skins but using filtered lake water.  Our lake has a lot of iron in it and therefore it reacted with the red onion skin and produced a nice shade of green.  Strangely, it didn’t affect the yellow onion skins.

I have a few more skeins to dye using black Walnut husks, which will compliment these skeins nicely in a planned woven rug, so stay tuned!

Deborah

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September KAL (Knit Along)

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For those knitters and fibre enthusiasts out there, you know the feeling of completing a KAL with a great bunch of like minded folk. For those that aren’t into fibre-arts, you are missing out!

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For the month of September,  I signed up to knit a shawl for a KAL group on Ravelry, which by the way, if you are not a part of and you are a fibre geek, then I suggest you head over pronto to sign up (its free) and you will then have access to oodles of patterns from mitts to socks to hats to sweaters and blankets in every style,  for every age, and most are free patterns!

Anyway, back to the KAL.

The group I am a part of is called the DIY & DYE, where we spin, dye and knit our creations from raw fleece.  I joined in with some alpaca that I had spun and hand-painted and included a commercial skein of yarn in a contrasting neon peach colour.

The pattern was somewhat simple, but it still took some concentration after making a….design element, yes we call mistakes “design elements”.  Aside from the impromptu changes to the pattern, I finished the project just one day outside of September, even with life getting in the way.

The pattern, called “Metalouse” by Stephen West (a well known knit designer in the knitting world) features a striking pattern created by slipped stitches in a contrasting colour that melds beautifully with the variegated handspun alpaca.

I simply love how this turned out and have another one planned very soon.  Have you been a part of a KAL or CAL (crochet along) or even a WAL (weave along)? If so, I would love to see your creations, feel free to tell me all about them or link your projects below!

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